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Thursday, February 16, 2012

I love your music, Mr. Theodorakis but your views are dangerous!

Mikis Theodorakis published an open letter alleging a conspiracy between certain Greeks and foreigners to destroy Greek society and Greece.

English version
German version

No conspirancy would find followers if it didn't include elements which either appear to be true or even are true. Mr. Theodorakis states many facts which are true and some which appear to be true.

I would agree with him when he says that "the Greek people became victims of the robbery duet between Germans and Greeks who enriched themselves at their expense".

Since he didn't clarify what he meant by "Greek people", I will offer my own definition. I would mean by that the masses of Greeks (hopefully still the majority) who are decent, correct, hard-working, friendly and open-hearted people who work tirelessly so that their children can have a better life. These "Greek people" probably had not much of a benefit from the Euro-party.

And instead of the "Germans" I would probably clarify that Germany accounted for about 15% of Greece's current account deficit since the Euro. Thus, there are another 85% somewhere who had fun with the Greek Euro-party, too.

Mr. Theodorakis is blatently wrong and misleading when he says "Mr. Papandreou could have countered the international crisis of 2008 by taking up foreign loans at 5% interest. Had he done that, there wouldn't have been the slightest problem for our country. On the contrary, the opposite would have occurred because we were in a period of economic upswing which means that our living standard would have increased even further".

I will not argue why this is wrong because it is so obvious. Details can be found here.

Why is this so dangerous?

It is always painful to be a victim. Anyone who wants to manipulate people to rise AGAINST something or someone will project on to them the victim's role. The victim does not think rationally. The victim pains and reacts to pain irrationally. Convince someone that he is a victim and point out to him how he can get revenge, and you have control over him.

What Greece needs now are leaders who can motivate people to rise FOR something. For a better future; for a better Greece; for a better world for their children.

About a year ago, the Huffington Post published an article titled "What Greece needs now is a new hero".

That is, indeed, what Greece would need now. And I would love Mr. Theodorakis to compose some beautiful music for that new hero instead of appealing to some of the worst human instincts (such as feeling to be the greatest victims in the world).

4 comments:

  1. I would like to add here, that many Europeans fear losing their cultural identity. Either through the EU or through the actions of another state, or goodness knows what.

    In my adult life I have lived in five different countries and two continents - indeed a little like your good self, Herr Kastner. In all that time, I have not lost my pure Oxford English - it shows through most of the languages I speak despite my ardent attempts to emulate the local patois.

    For all the fear that is spread about cultures losing their form or sense, these things simply do not wash off in the bath. In short, the Greeks will lose their sense of culture in a very Greek way, and having lost it, still be incurably Greek.

    You are right that the Greeks need a Greek hero: and not some politician who has been tainted with all that the recent past can smear him with. If they have any sense, it will be an unassuming but brave man who drives a bus or a fishing boat, grows olive oil or makes machinery in an Athens suburb - but does it in a way that inspires Greeks to look to their future and not their past.

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  2. Being a well-known artist does not necessarily mean that you have more insight than the average citizen, and it does not qualify you in any way to comment on matters of economic policy. Mr Theodorakis is just another example of this. To read his text is a waste of time.

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  3. Mr Kleingut, i am Greek and i have read some of your writings such as (Face the truth, Greeks! ...and foreign creditors as well!) . I think you have a good knowledge of the reality, practical ideas and you understand the greek pathogeneia.

    One issue is how the people first deal with politics (this is the worst) and political system operates, how canditates to be MP's are trying to gain votes with nepotism throught political parties with no reliable procedures.

    The other issue is the financial crisis, the Greek model for development, the unproductive corporate governance and responsibility which is correlated with political and cultural situation .

    But like in every society there is a silent majority (in ours is very silent) which simply want Greece to stay in euro zone by making huge sacrifices, because going back to drachma it would be a financial and social disaster.

    I understand we made huge mistakes. Our performance was poor so far but the criticism from Germany from magazines such as to sale Greek islands or Acropolis or financial elites like the CEO of Bosch, Franz Fehrenbach and Linde CEO creating somehow a bizarre situation where all Greeks are bad, thieves and cheating all Europeans.

    I understand the incompetence of Greek elites to fulfill specific targets such as to achieve primary deficit but one question is if the financial adjustment works properly and the other what Germany truly wants and I m talking about credible politicians and financial elites.

    By accepting elites in Germany that Greece should be forced OR EITHER LET OUT OF EURO ZONE WHEN TIME COMES as mnimonio is not implemented as it should, the situation for many Greeks who accept that Greece have to change drastically, some of them loosing gradually their faith to euro-zone countries like Germany about their way of thinking. They think that we are enemies.

    I believe if you don't have real and friendly interest and fervency in what you want to achieve with somebody what you want would never happen. And there is a need for a leader to convince.

    I want also to stress that Greece maybe is only 0.5% in 2011 of German exports but if we add Ireland, Portugal or even Italy or Spain consist of a far larger part of Germany exports.

    And i m refering to all these countries which are in a much better situation compared to Greece because many of them are in recession or in stagnation during 2012.
    But credit rate agencies perceive euro-zone as a hole and some of them might target the next problematic country which differently from Greece implementing very well the agreement.
    I don't believe for sure that if Greece exit the euro the euro zone will colapse or that any kind of EUROBONDS will save something but gradually is born a general and vital political issue for all Europe.
    The political repercassion in a possible exit of Greece is the issue, not anything else at all.

    The geopolitical role of Germany is limited only in central europe with countries of AAA or AA? Possible loss of geopolitical role from Germany would mean and future undefined loss of economic and political power.

    Only we are to blame but statements under new statements from people with kwoledge that Greece should leave or even let default is not at all productive and help only irresponsible politicians in Greece to find some kind of publicity and role. Is there a targeting?

    In far more difficult years when people were real enemies Germany reborn partly because all people dicided to have a common future. Today's problems are much easier but from life i have learn that huge power create responsibility, the inconceivable power create arrogance.
    I don't want Greece to be a burden to anyone as it is today and i m willing to accept a lot in order country to find a cure. Many people accept that in Greece people in Germany understand that?

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  4. And as agreed I used this post to create a post in my blog, to reach the people who follow me because of Mikis Theodorakis.
    Title: I love your music, Mr. Theodorakis, but…
    Link: http://theodorakisfriends.wordpress.com/2012/10/17/i-love-your-music-mr-theodorakis-but/

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